RUAN WEN DING 2010

Model Test 9

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Model Test 9

Post by Admin on Tue 08 Jun 2010, 21:14

[00:12.05]Model Test Nine
[00:15.27]Part Ⅲ Listening Comprehension
[00:18.41]Section A
[00:20.44]Directions: In this section, you will hear 8 short conversations
[00:26.44]and 2 long conversations. At the end of each conversation,
[00:31.47]one or more questions will be asked about what was said.
[00:34.38]Both the conversation and the questions will be spoken only once.
[00:39.50]After each question there will be a pause. During the pause,
[00:44.10]you must read the four choices marked A), B), C) and D),
[00:49.35]and decide which is the best answer.
[00:52.07]Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2
[00:56.72]with a single line through the centre.
[00:59.47]Now, let’s begin with the eight short conversations.
[01:04.51]11. M: How did you like it?
[01:07.63]Personally I think the classical chapters were fine,
[01:11.22]but the one composed by Maria was not quite in harmony.
[01:14.69]W: I thought so too. She might be a good conductor,
[01:18.41]but not a good composer.
[01:20.54]Q: What does the woman think of Maria?
[01:39.43]12. M: I heard you were at the preview of the new art exhibition —
[01:45.15]I didn’t see you there.
[01:46.77]W: The first few pieces were so ordinary
[01:49.46]that I didn’t stick around very long.
[01:51.53]Q: What does the woman mean?
[02:10.41]13. W: Hey, congratulations on winning the essay contest.
[02:16.51]That thousand-dollar prize money should really come in handy.
[02:20.44]M: You bet! I’ve already put it aside to cover
[02:23.91]the increase my landlord just announced for next year.
[02:27.03]Q: What does the man mean?
[02:45.32]14. W: Well, I am never doing this again!
[02:51.10]Seven courses in one semester are just too much.
[02:54.38]I don’t have a minute to myself.
[02:56.85]M: Well, I hate to say this, but …I told you so.
[03:01.47]Q: What does the man mean?
[03:20.00]15. M: Do you hear the weather report says
[03:24.81]we are going to get at least a foot of snow tomorrow?
[03:27.63]W: So great! That’s incredible.
[03:29.97]I can’t wait to get outside and play in it.
[03:32.47]Q: What does the woman mean?
[03:50.79]16. W: Someone told me the new restaurant
[03:55.38]on Main Street is pretty good.
[03:57.35]M: The environment is wonderful.
[03:59.69]But what’s more important to you,
[04:02.03]good food or nice environment?
[04:04.59]Q: What does the man imply?
[04:24.34]17. M: Can I borrow your math textbook?
[04:28.37]I lost mine on the bus.
[04:30.21]W: You’ve asked the right person.
[04:32.05]I happen to have an extra copy.
[04:34.21]Q: What does the woman mean?
[04:53.54]18. M: How careless you are! But forgetting to fasten your seat belt
[04:59.88]will not cost you a driving license.
[05:01.86]W: You’re right! There’s something else.
[05:04.33]I didn’t notice when the policeman waved for me to pull over
[05:07.20]and he chased me for almost a mile before I realized what happened.
[05:11.42]Q: What do we learn about the woman from the conversation?
[05:30.96]Now you’ll hear two long conversations.
[05:33.84]Conversation One
[05:37.65]M: Marylyn, is it possible to borrow your notes?
[05:40.99]I’ll return them tomorrow.
[05:43.12]W: Sorry, but I usually go to the cafeteria and review them.
[05:47.84]Say, how about copying them over in the library?
[05:50.83]M: Okay, I think I’ve got enough coins for the machines.
[05:54.55]You’re a lifesaver, Marylyn!
[05:56.68]W: No problem. But I don’t understand why you need my notes,
[06:00.30]Matt; you haven’t missed any classes.
[06:03.02]M: Weekday mornings, I’m a cashier at a coffee shop downtown.
[06:06.80]After work, I come directly to school. Marylyn, am I beat?
[06:11.87]W: Wow, you’re probably exhausted!
[06:14.27]M: That’s exactly why I want to borrow your notes;
[06:17.27]I’ve been nodding off during class, so my notes aren’t very good.
[06:21.21]I’m so happy that you lend your notes to me.
[06:24.14]W: Well, here’s Professor Labelle; how are you feeling?
[06:28.12]M: I’m usually awake at the beginning of class.
[06:31.15]But after thirty minutes,
[06:33.20]I have trouble keeping my eyes open.
[06:35.17]That’s really terrible, isn’t it?
[06:37.45]W: Listen, I need someone to study with,
[06:40.01]and you need someone to keep you awake.
[06:42.04]Shall we be study partners?
[06:43.80]M: Yeah, that’s a good idea. I’d sure appreciate it.
[06:47.74]W: Okay, let’s start today at the library. We’re going there anyway,
[06:51.70]and I don’t have to go to the cafeteria.
[06:54.02]M: Sounds good. Oh, no,
[06:56.76]it looks like he’s brought along some more of his slides;
[07:00.65]elbow me if I start drifting off.
[07:02.39]W: I’m afraid I won’t be very helpful; his slides make me sleepy too!
[07:08.25]Questions 19 to 21 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
[07:12.69]19. Why does Matt ask Marylyn for her notes?
[07:35.30]20. What does Marylyn propose to Matt?
[07:55.33]21. What do the two speakers think about the professor’s slides?
[08:17.57]Conversation Two
[08:19.64]W: Hello, listeners! Welcome to our program.
[08:23.61]Today’s guest is Dr. Howard Miller.
[08:26.64]Dr. Miller is a professor of Sociology at Washington University
[08:31.48]and has written numerous articles
[08:33.80]and books on the issues facing older Americans
[08:37.16]in our graying society for the past 15 years.
[08:40.56]M: Thank you for that introduction.
[08:43.09]W: Well, Dr. Miller, as a matter of fact,
[08:45.72]there are many issues facing aged people.
[08:48.16]Can you say something about those?
[08:50.60]M: Well, first, I want to share a story of my own life.
[08:54.79]Several years ago when my grandparents were well into their eighties,
[08:59.00]they were faced with the reality of no longer being able to
[09:03.03]adequately care for themsevles.
[09:05.03]W: Yeah, that is quite a common and natural problem with aged people.
[09:09.10]M: My grandfather spoke of his greatest fear,
[09:12.44]that of leaving the only home they had known for the past 60 years.
[09:17.25]The prospect of having to sell their home,
[09:19.84]giving up their independence
[09:21.51]and moving into a retirement home was an extremely
[09:25.38]depressing experience for them.
[09:27.57]W: That’s definitely sure.
[09:28.76]M: He was quite sad, exclaiming
[09:31.40]that he felt he wasn’t important anymore.
[09:34.78]W: Yeah, that’s a quite natural feeling.
[09:36.90]M: For them and some older Americans,
[09:39.60]this period of their lives means the decline of not only one’s health
[09:43.44]but the loss of identity and self-worth. In many societies,
[09:47.85]this self-identity is closely related with our social status,
[09:52.22]occupation, material possessions, or independence.
[09:56.20]W: So is there any way to help the elderly
[09:58.81]reestablish their self-identity?
[10:01.00]M: Well, I think it is important to find some meaningful roles
[10:04.87]the elderly can and should play in our societies.
[10:08.47]By doing something for the society,
[10:10.75]they will feel they are still useful and important.
[10:13.99]Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
[10:20.00]22. What are the two speakers talking about?
[10:42.51]23. What was Dr. Miller’s purpose in sharing
[10:47.19]the story about his grandfather?
[11:05.50]24. How did Dr. Miller’s grandparents feel
[11:09.78]when they moved into a retirement home?
[11:28.88]25. How can the society help the elderly feel important again
[11:34.64]according to Dr. Miller?
[11:52.97]Section B
[11:54.16]Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages.
[12:00.51]At the end of each passage, you will hear some questions.
[12:05.37]Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once.
[12:10.54]After you hear a question,
[12:13.25]you must choose the best answer
[12:15.45]from the four choices marked A), B), C) and D).
[12:20.33]Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2
[12:24.45]with a single line through the centre.
[12:26.37]Passage One
[12:29.21]Food is a basic necessity,
[12:32.00]so every culture has important norms and customs related to it.
[12:36.28]Ever since they adopted settled lifestyles centuries ago,
[12:40.75]most cultures have emphasized daily meals in households or family units.
[12:46.47]Some members provide the food,
[12:49.25]some members prepare the food, and all members must eat.
[12:53.36]The providers and the preparers may not be the same,
[12:56.96]depending partly on gender roles and specialization.
[13:00.58]And the status of individuals in the eating process may not be the same,
[13:06.21]depending partly on their age and gender,
[13:08.87]and whether the household contains servants or guests.
[13:12.18]Servants rarely eat with others,
[13:15.02]while honored guests may be wined and dined like visiting royalty.
[13:18.96]Elders and males may also be treated ceremonially.
[13:22.75]Eating away from home in restaurants, inns,
[13:26.06]or hotels has long been an option in most cultures,
[13:29.77]but the variety of these choices is rapidly increasing today
[13:34.09]as the fast pace of modern life encourages
[13:37.34]more people to “eat on the run”.
[13:39.53]This also tends to blur the traditional distinction
[13:43.25]between providers and preparers of food,
[13:46.27]especially in families where both parents work full time outside the home.
[13:51.81]In such cases both parents may eat out at noon,
[13:55.94]the children may eat at school,
[13:58.21]and anyone may pick up pizza or hamburgers
[14:01.00]on the way home or phone for pizza to be delivered.
[14:04.71]In the U.S., Chinese restaurants do a big take-out business
[14:09.21]and microwaved “TV dinners” are very popular.
[14:12.62]Some busy families rarely eat formal meals together,
[14:16.90]even when they all eat at home.
[14:19.81]Questions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[14:25.49]26. What determines the role of the providers and the preparers in a meal?
[14:49.52]27. Who are usually treated ceremonially?
[15:10.77]28. What can we learn from the passage?
[15:28.77]Passage Two
[15:29.85]Different countries and different races have different manners.
[15:33.98]Before entering a house in some Asian countries,
[15:37.22]it is good manners to take off your shoes.
[15:39.94]In European countries,
[15:41.91]even though shoes sometimes become very muddy, this is not done.
[15:45.47]A guest in a Chinese house never finishes a drink.
[15:48.97]He leaves a little,
[15:50.56]to show that he has had enough.
[15:52.53]In England, a guest always finishes a drink
[15:55.66]to show that he has enjoyed it.
[15:57.50]We must find out the customs of other races,
[16:00.17]so that they will not think us ill-mannered.
[16:02.91]But people all over the world agree
[16:05.34]that being well-mannered really means being kind and helping others,
[16:08.28]especially those older or weaker than ourselves. If you remember this,
[16:13.94]you will not go very far wrong.
[16:16.12]Here are some examples of the things
[16:19.57]that a well-mannered person does or does not do.
[16:22.06]He never laughs at people when they are in trouble.
[16:25.57]Instead, he tries to help them. He is always kind, never cruel,
[16:30.35]either to people or animals. When people are waiting for a bus,
[16:35.07]or in a post office, he takes his turn.
[16:37.98]He does not push to the front of the queue.
[16:41.13]In the bus, he gives his seat to an older person
[16:44.29]or a lady who is standing.
[16:46.23]If he accidentally bumps into someone, or gets in their way,
[16:49.63]he says “Excuse me” or “I’m sorry”.
[16:53.82]He says “Please” when making a request,
[16:56.61]and “Thank you” when he receives something.
[16:58.70]He stands up when speaking to a lady or an older person,
[17:02.26]and he does not sit down until the other person is seated.
[17:05.45]He does not talk too much himself.
[17:08.32]He does not talk with his mouth full of food.
[17:11.19]He uses a handkerchief when he sneezes or coughs.
[17:14.66]Questions 29 to 31 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[17:21.23]29. In which countries is it considered well mannered
[17:26.33]to take off your shoes before entering a house?
[17:45.64]30. Why does a guest in England always finish a drink?
[18:07.30]31. Which would be considered good manners
[18:12.12]in most countries of the world?
[18:30.51]Passage Three
[18:31.56]At the beginning of the 20th century,
[18:34.85]a new music called jazz was born in New Orleans.
[18:39.35]It was a kind of music intended to make people happy,
[18:44.07]but it was not so much a kind of music as a style of playing.
[18:48.19]The New Orleans musicians learned to work together
[18:52.51]to produce a relaxed beat.
[18:54.44]The beat is so powerful that the listeners can not help dancing.
[18:59.23]The best and almost the only place
[19:02.42]to hear the original New Orleans jazz
[19:04.82]is in Preservation Hall in the French Quarter of the city.
[19:08.64]There, seven different bands, made up mostly of very old men,
[19:13.64]play the old music each evening.
[19:16.34]Some of the people in the audience are tourists,
[19:19.26]but most are serious music lovers
[19:22.29]who are willing to spend time sitting on plain wooden chairs
[19:26.35]and benches, and even on the floor.
[19:28.56]The musicians play the music they want to play,
[19:31.53]but the audience can ask for a particular song
[19:34.76]if they are willing to pay for it.
[19:37.33]Traditional songs cost one dollar and all others cost two.
[19:41.95]Old-style New Orleans jazz is in danger of disappearing
[19:46.26]because the players are getting old.
[19:48.43]The music did disappear once before,
[19:51.04]when people lost interest in it and the musicians
[19:54.45]had to make their living doing other things.
[19:56.77]But in 1938 the current jazz revival began,
[20:00.83]when music historian William Russell
[20:04.08]found a famous trumpet player Bunk Johnson
[20:06.92]working in the field and brought him back to New Orleans to play.
[20:10.92]When Preservation Hall reopened in 1961,
[20:14.33]the old music finally had a place to live again,
[20:18.36]and its popularity has grown ever since.
[20:21.55]Questions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[20:26.89]32. Which is true about jazz according to the passage?
[20:49.41]33. Where do people hear the original New Orleans jazz?
[21:12.60]34. Why is the New Orleans jazz in danger?
[21:33.21]35. What did William Russell do?
[21:54.42]Section C
[21:55.52]Directions: In this section,
[21:58.47]you will hear a passage three times.
[22:00.88]When the passage is read for the first time,
[22:04.01]you should listen carefully for its general idea.
[22:07.26]When the passage is read for the second time,
[22:10.63]you are required to fill in the blanks numbered
[22:14.19]from 36 to 43 with the exact words you have just heard.
[22:18.60]For blanks numbered from 44 to 46 you are required to
[22:25.23]fill in the missing information. For these blanks,
[22:29.44]you can either use the exact words you have just heard
[22:33.01]or write down the main points in your own words.
[22:36.44]Finally, when the passage is read for the third time,
[22:40.94]you should check what you have written.
[22:43.44]Now listen to the passage.
[22:46.57]The American education system requires
[22:49.97]that students complete 12 years of
[22:52.19]primary and secondary education prior
[22:55.04]to attending university or college.
[22:57.38]This may be accomplished either at public
[22:59.79]or government-operated schools,
[23:01.63]or at private schools.
[23:03.38]These 12 years of schooling or
[23:05.98]their equivalent may also be completed
[23:08.13]outside the USA, thus giving foreign students the opportunity
[23:12.29]to pursue the benefits of the American education system
[23:15.66]and obtain a quality American education.
[23:18.44]Perhaps one of the most impressive facts is
[23:22.10]the large number of presidents,
[23:23.88]prime ministers and leaders from other countries
[23:26.63]who have experienced the American education system
[23:29.97]and graduated from a university or school in the USA.
[23:33.88]That is why graduating from an officially
[23:37.35]acknowledged American school
[23:39.25]and being exposed to the rigors of the American education system
[23:43.23]is an investment in your future.
[23:45.35]The American education system offers
[23:47.85]international students the most diverse
[23:50.38]set of education options in the world. In fact,
[23:53.79]an international student who elects to take advantage of
[23:57.60]the American education system
[23:59.50]can pursue anything from nuclear science to film and dance.
[24:03.53]American education possibilities are almost endless!
[24:07.50]Whether you want to study
[24:09.50]at a top USA university, or high school,
[24:12.41]a thorough understanding of
[24:14.57]how the American education system works is essential.
[24:17.54]Without a clear grasp of the American education system,
[24:21.22]an international student will find
[24:23.85]it difficult to make the right academic choices.
[24:26.57]The information about top universities, colleges,
[24:30.07]community colleges, graduate schools,
[24:32.70]and boarding schools in the American education system
[24:36.32]will help you develop that understanding.
[24:38.82]It is no surprise that the American education system
[24:42.32]and the American school system host more international students
[24:46.61]than any other country in the world!
[24:49.70]Now the passage will be read again.
[24:53.05]The American education system requires
[24:56.51]that students complete 12 years of
[24:59.01]primary and secondary education prior to
[25:02.10]attending university or college.
[25:04.39]This may be accomplished either at public
[25:06.61]or government-operated schools,
[25:08.42]or at private schools.
[25:10.48]These 12 years of schooling or
[25:12.60]their equivalent may also be completed
[25:14.61]outside the USA, thus giving foreign students the opportunity
[25:18.60]to pursue the benefits of the American education system
[25:21.89]and obtain a quality American education.
[25:25.32]Perhaps one of the most impressive facts is
[25:28.98]the large number of presidents,
[25:30.72]prime ministers and leaders from other countries
[25:33.50]who have experienced the American education system
[25:36.75]and graduated from a university or school in the USA.
[25:40.60]That is why graduating from an officially acknowledged American school
[25:45.10]and being exposed to the rigors of
[25:47.94]the American education system
[25:49.97]is an investment in your future.
[25:52.13]The American education system offers
[25:54.44]international students the most diverse
[25:57.06]set of education options in the world. In fact,
[26:00.50]an international student who elects to take advantage of
[26:04.06]the American education system
[26:05.91]can pursue anything from nuclear science to film and dance.
[27:00.87]American education possibilities are almost endless!
[27:04.21]Whether you want to study at a top USA university, or high school,
[27:08.79]a thorough understanding of
[27:11.10]how the American education system works is essential.
[27:14.58]Without a clear grasp of the American education system,
[27:18.27]an international student will
[27:20.01]find it difficult to make the right academic choices.
[28:13.58]The information about top universities, colleges,
[28:16.40]community colleges, graduate schools,
[28:19.27]and boarding schools in the American education system
[28:22.68]will help you develop that understanding.
[28:25.18]It is no surprise that the American education system
[28:28.62]and the American school system host more international students
[28:32.77]than any other country in the world!
[29:27.11]Now the passage will be read for the third time.
[29:30.70]The American education system requires
[29:33.49]that students complete 12 years of
[29:35.90]primary and secondary education prior to
[29:38.83]attending university or college.
[29:40.96]This may be accomplished either at public
[29:43.09]or government-operated schools,
[29:45.65]or at private schools.
[29:46.87]These 12 years of schooling or their equivalent may also be completed
[29:51.02]outside the USA, thus giving foreign students the opportunity
[29:55.27]to pursue the benefits of the American education system
[29:59.02]and obtain a quality American education.
[30:02.33]Perhaps one of the most impressive facts is
[30:05.58]the large number of presidents,
[30:07.44]prime ministers and leaders from other countries
[30:10.64]who have experienced the American education system
[30:13.83]and graduated from a university or school in the USA.
[30:17.37]That is why graduating from
[30:20.11]an officially acknowledged American school
[30:22.11]and being exposed to the rigors of the American education system
[30:26.24]is an investment in your future.
[30:28.49]The American education system offers
[30:30.99]international students the most diverse
[30:33.37]set of education options in the world. In fact,
[30:37.21]an international student who elects to take advantage of
[30:40.87]the American education system
[30:42.71]can pursue anything from nuclear science to film and dance.
[30:46.83]American education possibilities are almost endless!
[30:51.05]Whether you want to study at a top USA university, or high school,
[30:55.55]a thorough understanding of
[30:57.61]how the American education system works is essential.
[31:00.71]Without a clear grasp of the American education system,
[31:04.61]an international student will find
[31:07.30]it difficult to make the right academic choices.
[31:09.64]The information about top universities, colleges,
[31:13.46]community colleges, graduate schools,
[31:16.30]and boarding schools in the American education system
[31:20.27]will help you develop that understanding.
[31:22.58]It is no surprise that the American education system
[31:25.77]and the American school system host more international students
[31:30.02]than any other country in the world!
[31:33.71]This is the end of listening comprehension.

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