RUAN WEN DING 2010

Model Test 4

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Model Test 4

Post by Admin on Tue 08 Jun 2010, 21:11

[00:10.00]Model Test Four
[00:14.00]Part Ⅲ Listening Comprehension
[00:17.00]Section A
[00:19.00]Directions: In this section, you will hear 8 short conversations
[00:24.00]and 2 long conversations. At the end of each conversation, one
[00:29.00]or more questions will be asked about what was said. Both the
[00:34.00]conversation and the questions will be spoken only once. After
[00:39.00]each question there will be a pause. During the pause, you must
[00:43.00]read the four choices marked A), B), C) and D), and decide which
[00:49.00]is the best answer. Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer
[00:54.00]Sheet 2 with a single line through the centre.
[00:59.00]Now, let’s begin with the eight short conversations.
[01:04.00]11. W: I see you’re working on something right now, John. As soon
[01:09.00]as you finish, I’d like to talk to you for a few minutes.
[01:13.00]M: Well you can talk to me now. Otherwise, I’m afraid you might
[01:18.00]have a long wait. I’m working on a paper.
[01:21.00]Q: What does the man mean?
[01:38.00]12. M: I see. You’re late because you had a flat tire. But couldn’t
[01:44.00]you have telephoned?
[01:46.00]W: I was going to but I didn’t have any change for a pay phone.
[01:51.00]Q: What can we learn from the conversation?
[02:09.00]13. W: Professor Harrison helps me so much that I’m thinking of
[02:15.00]buying him a book of poetry.
[02:17.00]M: I think you should get him a record, just because he’s an
[02:21.00]English teacher and it doesn’t mean all he does is to read.
[02:25.00]Q: What does the man mean?
[02:42.00]14. M: David was supposed to be here an hour ago. Could I have
[02:47.00]given him the wrong address for the restaurant?
[02:51.00]W: I doubt it. This is pretty typical for David.
[02:54.00]Q: What does the woman imply about David?
[03:13.00]15. W: Things aren’t what they used to be, are they?
[03:19.00]M: No, they aren’t. Everything is upside down these days.
[03:23.00]People haven’t even got good manners any more. Look at the
[03:27.00]way children act.
[03:29.00]Q: What are the two speakers complaining about?
[03:48.00]16. M: After a whole day’s exam, I am really exhausted. But
[03:55.00]I still haven’t prepared tomorrow’s lessons.
[03:58.00]W: If I were you, I would omit it. They are not as important
[04:02.00]as you imagined. Also we both need to get up early tomorrow morning.
[04:07.00]Q: What does the woman mean?
[04:26.00]17. M: Let me look in the TV Guide. There is a quiz show going
[04:32.00]on Channel 14. Pass me the remote control. I’ll flip around
[04:37.00]and see it.
[04:38.00]W: I don’t think there is anything worth watching at this
[04:41.00]moment. But let me finish this special.
[04:45.00]Q: What are the two speakers probably going to do next?
[05:05.00]18. M: Is this the bus for the beach?
[05:09.00]W: No. You’re going the wrong way. This bus is No. 15,
[05:13.00]going to the science museum. You want No. 50 bus, which
[05:18.00]stops in front of the post office, and then you can get
[05:21.00]straight to the beach there.
[05:24.00]Q: What can be inferred from the conversation?
[05:42.00]Now you’ll hear two long conversations.
[05:46.00]Conversation One
[05:48.00]W: Hello. Nancy Ellis speaking.
[05:51.00]M: Hello, Dr. Ellis, my name’s David Steward. My roommate,
[05:55.00]John Smith, wanted me to call you.
[05:58.00]W: John Smith? Oh, that’s right; he’s in my Shakespearean
[06:01.00]English class. Has anything happened to him?
[06:05.00]M: Nothing. It’s just that he submitted a job application
[06:08.00]yesterday and the company asked him in for an interview today.
[06:13.00]He’s afraid he won’t be able to attend your class this afternoon,
[06:17.00]though. I’m calling to see if it would be okay if I gave you his
[06:21.00]essay. John said it’s due today.
[06:24.00]W: Certainly, that would be fine. Uh, you could either drop it off
[06:29.00]at my class or bring it to my office.
[06:32.00]M: Would it be alright to come by your office around 4∶00? It’s
[06:36.00]impossible to come any earlier because I have three classes this afternoon.
[06:41.00]W: Uh, I won’t be here when you come; I’m supposed to be at a
[06:45.00]meeting from 3 to 6, but how about leaving it with my secretary?
[06:51.00]She usually stays until 5∶00.
[06:54.00]M: Fine, please tell her I’ll be there at 4∶00. And Dr. Ellis,
[06:58.00]one more thing, could you tell me where your office is located?
[07:02.00]John told me where your class is, but he didn’t give me directions
[07:07.00]to your office.
[07:08.00]W: Well, I’m in Room 302 of the Gregory Building. I’ll tell my
[07:12.00]secretary to put the paper in my mail box, and I’ll get it when
[07:17.00]I return.
[07:18.00]M: I sure appreciate it; John was worried about not getting
[07:22.00]his paper in on time.
[07:24.00]W: No problem. I’ll look for John’s paper later this evening.
[07:28.00]Good-bye, Mr. Steward.
[07:29.00]M: Bye, Dr. Ellis. Thanks again.
[07:32.00]Questions 19 to 21 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
[07:38.00]19. What are the speakers mainly talking about?
[07:59.00]20. What is the reason why the man’s roommate can’t attend the afternoon’s class?
[08:21.00]21. What will Dr. Ellis be doing when David comes to her office?
[08:44.00]Conversation Two
[08:46.00]W: Good afternoon, Mr. Green. I’m planning to go abroad
[08:49.00]for study. Do you think I should get some health insurance?
[08:53.00]M: I think so. One unexpected medical emergency can drain your
[08:58.00]financial resources, leaving you with no money to pay for school.
[09:02.00]As a result, you’ll have no choice but to return to your own country.
[09:08.00]W: How can I get health insurance?
[09:11.00]M: You really have two basic choices for health insurance: obtain
[09:15.00]international insurance in your home country before you depart or
[09:20.00]student health insurance once you arrive.
[09:23.00]W: Then how to get international insurance?
[09:26.00]M: As for international insurance, you’ll have to pay the
[09:29.00]medical costs in full on your own. If you have sufficient
[09:33.00]funds, then this won’t be a problem.
[09:36.00]W: Oh, that seems not suitable for me. What about the second
[09:39.00]option?
[09:40.00]M: As for the second option, you’ll probably just have to
[09:44.00]pay a certain percentage, and the company will pay their part.
[09:47.00]W: That sounds good. Then what should we note when signing
[09:51.00]the insurance agreement?
[09:53.00]M: Well, be sure to clearly understand the terms of the
[09:56.00]agreement you sign with the insurance company. There are
[10:00.00]often a number of limitations and restrictions with the
[10:03.00]policy, and understanding them up front will reduce the
[10:08.00]number of misunderstandings that could arise.
[10:11.00]W: Oh, I see.
[10:12.00]M: It is wise of you to consider health insurance before
[10:15.00]going abroad to study. However, many students only think
[10:20.00]about insurance when it is too late as they sit in the
[10:23.00]hospital’s emergency room. So get insurance to help
[10:27.00]you pay for your medical expenses; otherwise, you might
[10:31.00]not have money for tomorrow’s school tuition.
[10:34.00]W: Well, I think I’ve got all the information I need.
[10:37.00]Thank you so much, Mr. Green.
[10:39.00]M: You’re welcome.
[10:41.00]Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation you
[10:45.00]have just heard.
[10:47.00]22. What is the possible result of having no health
[10:51.00]insurance when one studies abroad?
[11:10.00]23. What kind of insurance will the woman probably
[11:14.00]decide to take?
[11:32.00]24. What should one pay attention to when signing an
[11:36.00]insurance contract?
[11:55.00]25. What do we learn from the end of the conversation?
[12:15.00]Section B
[12:17.00]Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages.
[12:23.00]At the end of each passage, you will hear some questions.
[12:28.00]Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once.
[12:33.00]After you hear a question, you must choose the best answer
[12:38.00]from the four choices marked A), B), C) and D). Then mark
[12:44.00]the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2 with a single
[12:48.00]line through the centre.
[12:50.00]Passage One
[12:51.00]Most people who work in London get a break of about an hour
[12:54.00]for lunch. As they most live too far from home to go back for
[12:59.00]lunch, they have to make other arrangements for their midday meal.
[13:03.00]Many large companies have a canteen designed for their employees.
[13:08.00]In such canteens the food served is simple but adequate and although
[13:13.00]there is a variety of choices, the number of dishes is small. The
[13:18.00]employees themselves fetch their dishes from a counter at which
[13:21.00]they are served.
[13:24.00]As there are so many people at work in London, there are numerous
[13:27.00]cafes and restaurants in every area that is not purely residential.
[13:32.00]A meal may cost anything from a modest sum to quite a few pounds,
[13:36.00]depending on the restaurant and the food chosen. Moreover, one can
[13:41.00]generally get a meal, or at least a snack, in a pub. A number of
[13:45.00]well-known caterers run popular cafes in practically every district
[13:50.00]of London. In many of these cafes there is self-service—there are
[13:55.00]no waiters or waitresses.
[13:57.00]Many employees do not bother to go out to lunch. They bring their
[14:02.00]own sandwiches, and perhaps an apple or bread, with which they have
[14:06.00]a cup of tea, probably made in the office. This method has the
[14:11.00]advantages of being cheap and saving time in getting to a restaurant
[14:15.00]and queuing up there. In summer, many people go out and sit on a
[14:20.00]bench in a park or public square, and eat their sandwiches there.
[14:25.00]They are often able to listen to lunch-time concerts and plays, too.
[14:29.00]Questions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[14:35.00]26. Why don’t most Londoners go home for lunch?
[14:56.00]27. Which is true according to the passage?
[15:15.00]28. Which is the main idea of this passage?
[15:36.00]Passage Two
[15:37.00]Most people picture sharks as huge, powerful, frightening animals
[15:42.00]that eat meat, ready at any moment to use their sharp teeth to attack
[15:48.00]careless swimmers without provocation. There are numerous wrong opinions,
[15:53.00] however, in this conception of sharks.
[15:56.00]First of all, there are about 350 species of shark, and not all of them are
[16:02.00]large. They range in size from the dwarf shark, which can be only 6 inches
[16:08.00]long and can be held in the palm of the hand, to the whale shark, which can
[16:13.00]be more than 55 feet long.
[16:17.00]A second wrong opinion concerns the number and type of teeth, which can
[16:21.00]vary tremendously among different species of shark. A shark can have from
[16:27.00]one to seven sets of teeth at the same time, and some types of shark can
[16:32.00]have several hundred teeth in each jaw. It is true that the fierce and
[16:37.00]predatory species do possess extremely sharp and brutal teeth used to
[16:42.00]rip prey apart; many other types of shark, however, have teeth more
[16:48.00]adapted to grabbing and holding than to cutting and slashing.
[16:53.00]Finally, not all sharks are frightening animals ready to strike out at
[16:58.00]humans. In fact, only 12 of the 350 species of shark have been known to
[17:04.00]attack humans, and a shark needs to be provoked in order to attack. The
[17:10.00]types of shark that have the worst record with humans are the tiger
[17:14.00]shark, the bull shark and the great white shark. However, for most
[17:19.00]species of shark, even some of the largest types, there are no known
[17:24.00]instances of attacks on humans.
[17:27.00]Questions 29 to 31 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[17:33.00]29.What is the main purpose of the passage?
[17:53.00]30.Which is probably the longest shark?
[18:14.00]31.Which is true according to the passage?
[18:35.00]Passage Three
[18:37.00]University teaching in the United Kingdom is very different at both
[18:41.00]undergraduate and graduate levels from that of many overseas countries.
[18:47.00]An undergraduate course consists of a series of lectures, seminars
[18:51.00]and tutorials and, in science and engineering, laboratory classes,
[18:57.00]which in total account for about 15 hours per week. Arts students
[19:01.00]may well find that their official contact with teachers is less
[19:05.00]than this average, while science and engineering students may
[19:09.00]expect to be timetabled for up to 20 hours per week. Students
[19:14.00]studying for a particular degree will take a series of lecture
[19:18.00]courses which run in parallel at a fixed time in each week and
[19:22.00]may last one academic term or the whole year. Associated with
[19:27.00]each lecture course are seminars, tutorials and laboratory
[19:31.00]classes which draw upon, analyze, illustrate or amplify the
[19:37.00]topics presented in the lectures. Lecture classes can vary
[19:41.00]in size from 20 to 200 although larger sized lectures tend
[19:45.00]to decrease as students progress into the second and third
[19:49.00]year and more options become available. Seminars and tutorials
[19:54.00]are on the whole much smaller than lecture classes and in some
[19:59.00]departments can be on a one-to-one basis. Students are normally
[20:03.00]expected to prepare work in advance for seminars and tutorials
[20:08.00]and this can take the form of researching a topic for
[20:10.00]discussion, by writing essays or by solving problems. Lectures,
[20:16.00]seminars and tutorials are all one hour in length, while
[20:20.00]laboratory classes usually last 2 or 3 hours. Much emphasis
[20:24.00]is put on how to spend as much time if not more studying by
[20:29.00]themselves as being taught. In the UK it is still common for
[20:33.00]people to say that they are “reading” for a degree!
[20:36.00]Questions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[20:42.00]32. What’s the difference between science courses and arts courses?
[21:05.00]33. Which is true according to the passage?
[21:26.00]34. Which class does last longest according to the passage?
[21:48.00]35. In which country do students usually say that they are “reading” for degrees?
[22:12.00]Section C
[22:14.00]Directions: In this section, you will hear a passage three times.
[22:18.00]When the passage is read for the first time, you should listen
[22:23.00]carefully for its general idea. When the passage is read for the
[22:27.00]second time, you are required to fill in the blanks numbered from
[22:31.00]36 to 43 with the exact words you have just heard. For blanks numbered
[22:39.00]from 44 to 46 you are required to fill in the missing information. For
[22:46.00]these blanks, you can either use the exact words you have just heard or
[22:51.00]write down the main points in your own words. Finally, when the passage
[22:57.00]is read for the third time, you should check what you have written.
[23:02.00]Now listen to the passage.
[23:05.00]By the early 1900’s, many people in the United States began to worry
[23:10.00]about the use of alcohol by citizens. It was possible that the drinking
[23:15.00]people could become a threat to themselves and the people around them.
[23:19.00]Alcohol makes their bodies not react as quickly to danger. Long time
[23:25.00]use of alcohol can cause permanent damage to organs in the body such
[23:30.00]as the liver.In 1905, three states made it illegal to drink or have
[23:36.00]alcohol within the state. By 1912, nine states made alcohol unlawful.
[23:43.00]In 1916, twenty-six of the forty-eight states had prohibited the use
[23:49.00]of alcohol. In 1919, members of Congress passed the Eighteenth Amendment,
[23:56.00]which made it illegal to make, sell, or transport alcohol in the United States.
[24:03.00]Prohibition officially began on January 16, 1920.
[24:08.00]Often times when a law is passed, it seems to be an invitation for some people
[24:14.00]to try and get around that law. This happened often during Prohibition.
[24:20.00] The Volstead Act spelled out when, where and how much alcohol could be
[24:25.00]produced and could still be used legally. Alcohol as a medicine was
[24:30.00]still allowed. A doctor could prescribe alcohol to a patient. The patient
[24:36.00]could take his or her prescription to a druggist, and the druggist
[24:40.00]had to give the patient the alcohol.
[24:43.00]If you look closely, you will see that the Eighteenth Amendment says
[24:48.00]you can’t make, sell, or transport alcohol. It said nothing
[24:52.00]about drinking it, so private drinking clubs were set up
[24:57.00]all over the country. A guard was at the door to make sure no
[25:01.00]government agents tried to come into the club.
[25:05.00]Now the passage will be read again.
[25:09.00]By the early 1900’s, many people in the United States began to worry
[25:16.00]about the use of alcohol by citizens. It was possible that the drinking people
[25:21.00] could become a threat to themselves and the people around them. Alcohol makes
[25:26.00]their bodies not react as quickly to danger. Long time use of alcohol can cause
[25:33.00] permanent damage to organs in the body such as the liver.
[25:37.00]In 1905, three states made it illegal to drink or have alcohol within the state.
[25:45.00]By 1912, nine states made alcohol unlawful. In 1916, twenty-six of the forty-eight
[25:54.00]states had prohibited the use of alcohol. In 1919, members of Congress passed the
[26:00.00]Eighteenth Amendment, which made it illegal to make, sell, or transport alcohol
[26:07.00]in the United States. Prohibition officially began on January 16, 1920. Often
[26:15.00]times when a law is passed, it seems to be an invitation for some people to try
[26:21.00]and get around that law. This happened often during Prohibition. The Volstead
[26:27.00]Act spelled out when, where and how much alcohol could be produced and could
[26:32.00]still be used legally.
[27:25.00]Alcohol as a medicine was still allowed. A doctor could
[27:29.00]prescribe alcohol to a patient. The patient could take his or her prescription
[27:34.00]to a druggist, and the druggist had to give the patient the alcohol.
[28:30.00]If you look closely, you will see that the Eighteenth Amendment says you
[28:34.00]can’t make, sell, or transport alcohol. It said nothing about drinking it,
[28:41.00]so private drinking clubs were set up all over the country.
[29:35.00]A guard was at the door to make sure no government agents tried to
[29:39.00]come into the club.
[29:43.00]Now the passage will be read for the third time.
[29:47.00]By the early 1900’s, many people in the United States began to worry about
[29:53.00]the use of alcohol by citizens. It was possible that the drinking people
[29:58.00]could become a threat to themselves and the people around them. Alcohol
[30:03.00]makes their bodies not react as quickly to danger. Long time use of alcohol
[30:09.00] can cause permanent damage to organs in the body such as the liver.
[30:15.00]In 1905, three states made it illegal to drink or have alcohol within
[30:20.00]the state. By 1912, nine states made alcohol unlawful. In 1916, twenty-six
[30:28.00]of the forty-eight states had prohibited the use of alcohol. In 1919,
[30:36.00]members of Congress passed the Eighteenth Amendment, which made it
[30:40.00]illegal to make, sell, or transport alcohol in the United States.
[30:46.00]Prohibition officially began on January 16, 1920. Often times when
[30:53.00]a law is passed, it seems to be an invitation for some people to
[30:57.00]try and get around that law. This happened often during Prohibition.
[31:03.00]The Volstead Act spelled out when, where and how much alcohol could
[31:08.00]be produced and could still be used legally. Alcohol as a medicine
[31:13.00] was still allowed. A doctor could prescribe alcohol to a patient.
[31:18.00]The patient could take his or her prescription to a druggist, and
[31:22.00]the druggist had to give the patient the alcohol.
[31:26.00]If you look closely, you will see that the Eighteenth Amendment
[31:30.00]says you can’t make, sell, or transport alcohol. It said nothing
[31:35.00]about drinking it, so private drinking clubs were set up all over
[31:40.00]the country. A guard was at the door to make sure no government
[31:44.00]agents tried to come into the club.
[31:47.00]This is the end of listening comprehension.

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