RUAN WEN DING 2010

Model Test 1

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Model Test 1

Post by Admin on Tue 08 Jun 2010, 21:09

[00:14.11]Model Test One
[00:16.30]Part Ⅲ Listening Comprehension
[00:19.51]Section A
[00:21.48]Directions: In this section, you will hear 8 short conversations
[00:27.55]and 2 long conversations. At the end of each conversation,
[00:31.89]one or more questions will be asked about what was said.
[00:36.32]Both the conversation and the questions will be spoken only once.
[00:40.76]After each question there will be a pause. During the pause,
[00:45.70]you must read the four choices marked A), B), C) and D),
[00:51.20]and decide which is the best answer.
[00:54.04]Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2
[00:58.42]with a single line through the centre.
[01:01.45]Now, let’s begin with the eight short conversations.
[01:07.14]11. M: How to control environmental pollution
[01:12.39]for the sake of people’s health?
[01:15.07]W: There are many methods adopted by the government.
[01:18.04]But it’s pretty hard. Some purifying devices are not effective.
[01:22.70]The effective devices are too expensive.
[01:26.45]And many developing countries need heavy industries to increase their GDP.
[01:33.13]Q: What do we learn from the conversation?
[01:51.86]12. M: Mrs. Brown, I ask for your forgiveness.
[01:56.86]I’m sorry that I accidentally broke the vase in the living room.
[02:01.27]If you don’t mind, I’m willing to compensate you for it.
[02:05.70]W: That’s OK. What is done is done. I never liked it anyway.
[02:10.64]Q: What do we learn about the woman from the conversation?
[02:30.55]13. M: Rose, here you are! But why did you take so long to get here?
[02:37.22]Is there a heavy traffic?
[02:40.34]W: Something came up on the way.
[02:42.15]A careless walker was killed in a horrible car accident.
[02:46.05]The road was closed, so I had to turn right to take another road.
[02:51.24]Q: Why was the woman late for the appointment?
[03:10.03]14. M: I wonder when this wet weather will clear up.
[03:16.34]I’m getting sick and tired of this hot, humid and gloomy weather.
[03:21.59]W: But it beats cold weather of winter, doesn’t it?
[03:24.72]And the weatherman expects cloudy skies to clear up
[03:28.56]by sunrise and winds to die down.
[03:32.09]Q: What will the weather be like?
[03:51.08]15. M: Lily, you should learn from your brother.
[03:55.37]He’s found a part-time job already.
[03:58.30]W: But, papa. As far as I know he doesn’t work for supporting himself.
[04:03.18]Actually, he lost a large sum of money in gambling.
[04:08.03]He’s working to pay off his debts.
[04:10.78]Q: What do we learn from the conversation?
[04:29.94]16. M: Amy, I regret to tell you that your brother failed again in his math.
[04:38.09]I guess it is to your great disappointment.
[04:41.51]But I remember he had promised to work harder from then on.
[04:45.66]W: He has promised like that many times.
[04:49.06]Q: What do we learn about Amy’s brother from the conversation?
[05:10.46]17. M: Do you have any special interests outside of your job?
[05:15.71]W: Yes. Music and painting are my two great interests in life.
[05:20.33]On weekends I sometimes make an excursion to the suburbs with my family.
[05:25.86]Besides, during weekdays I generally entertain myself in watching football matches.
[05:33.18]Q: What does the woman sometimes do on weekends?
[05:49.02]18. M: In fact, I don’t like tea at all.
[05:53.58]But I drink it anyway because I know it’s good for my health.
[05:57.71]W: That’s really interesting.
[05:59.74]I can never take things that I don’t like even if it’s best food.
[06:04.65]Take beef for example, I dislike its taste.
[06:08.86]Q: What do we learn about the woman from the conversation?
[06:30.45]Now you’ll hear two long conversations.
[06:33.11]Conversation One
[06:34.86]W: How are you doing? You look tired.
[06:38.01]M: I’m a little burnt out.
[06:40.64]I’ve been surfing the Net for the last few hours.
[06:43.86]W: Were you doing schoolwork, or was it just for pleasure?
[06:47.76]M: Well, I wanted to get some information on South America for a project I have,
[06:53.52]but I found a really interesting chat site
[06:57.20]with people from there and started chatting.
[06:59.98]W: Well, did you get the information you needed?
[07:02.73]M: Yes, but then we spent lots of time chatting about other interests.
[07:07.48]W: I see. The Internet is a wonderful place.
[07:11.11]There is so much information available.
[07:13.96]I completely understand how you can get distracted.
[07:18.08]Sometimes I find myself looking for one piece of information,
[07:22.54]but by the time I am finished I have a lot
[07:25.91]more than I started off looking for.
[07:29.26]M: I know. One thing I really don’t like about it,
[07:33.19]though, is it takes so much longer to find things,
[07:36.72]because many sites are useless.
[07:39.29]W: Yes, there’s that, and also,
[07:41.10]I often find the same site over and over again in a search.
[07:46.10]That definitely wastes lots of my time.
[07:49.04]M: Of course, there are sites that offer little to no relevant information
[07:54.29]on the topic you are searching for.
[07:56.51]With all the time I spend on it,
[07:59.41]I still find it to be the best source of information available.
[08:03.16]And speaking of information,
[08:05.72]I really should read through what I got on the Internet
[08:09.35]and start working on my project.
[08:11.47]W: Okay. Good luck. It’s funny we had this chat,
[08:15.40]as I was just on my way home to surf the Net myself.
[08:19.18]M: Well, it was nice talking to you,
[08:22.12]and maybe I’ll meet you in a chat room later tonight.
[08:25.63]Questions 19 to 21 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
[08:31.35]19. What has the man being doing for the last few hours?
[08:53.29]20. What doesn’t the man like about the Internet?
[09:14.81]21. What is the man going to do?
[09:34.43]Conversation Two
[09:37.55]W: Alexander, you speak quite good English.
[09:40.99]How did you learn a foreign language so well?
[09:43.43]You know English is really a headache for me.
[09:46.90]I just don’t know how to learn it well.
[09:50.18]M: Well, when learning a foreign language,
[09:53.43]I would surround myself in the language,
[09:55.99]the target language, that I wanted to learn.
[09:59.12]W: Surround oneself in the language?
[10:01.93]I think it is difficult to do that.
[10:04.43]Can you explain how you do it?
[10:06.74]M: Uh, for example, I would watch a movie in that language,
[10:11.80]uh, which would help me keep motivated to learn vocabulary and phrases.
[10:17.05]W: That sounds interesting.
[10:18.74]M: Yeah, you’ll have a lot of fun by doing so.
[10:22.08]W: I see.
[10:23.49]A little bit of practice every day is very important to language learning.
[10:28.21]M: Yes. Regular practice is also better than practicing a lot in one day.
[10:34.18]Learning a language well needs patience and perseverance.
[10:39.12]W: Then what else did you do to learn a foreign language?
[10:42.61]M: Well, I would keep a situational notebook.
[10:46.61]W: What is that used for?
[10:49.62]M: Uh, for example, in a restaurant,
[10:52.80]you use a certain phrase over and over again,
[10:55.82]and so if you can remember just one particular phrase in each setting,
[11:00.44]then you can immediately speak that language and have more confidence,
[11:04.75]and you get more out of learning the language, I think.
[11:08.72]W: Really? I’ll try that. Thank you for your advice.
[11:12.50]M: You’re welcome.
[11:14.00]Questions 22 to 25 are based on the conversation you have just heard.
[11:21.13]Question 22. What is the man doing?
[11:37.68]Question 23. How does the man surround himself in the target language?
[12:00.70]Question 24. What does the man learn from his listening activities?
[12:22.85]Question 25. What is the use of keeping a situational notebook?
[12:45.54]Section B
[12:46.94]Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages.
[12:53.64]At the end of each passage, you will hear some questions.
[12:57.95]Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once.
[13:03.17]After you hear a question, you must choose the best answer
[13:08.04]from the four choices marked A), B), C) and D).
[13:13.08]Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2
[13:17.35]with a single line through the centre.
[13:19.35]Passage One
[13:21.29]The biggest recent change in eating habits and food-related lifestyles
[13:27.04]is the advent of fast food. This permits many people to eat conveniently
[13:32.98]without having to prepare it.
[13:34.98]But it also makes family-style meals less likely to be,
[13:39.20]and it is not always very nutritious.
[13:42.32]The clever marketing of fast food such as KFC may cause some youngsters
[13:49.22]to dislike their parents’ cooking and some college students
[13:53.13]to dislike the more nutritious food available on campus.
[13:57.63]Eating fast food while driving is also a cause of traffic accidents.
[14:03.54]Sociologist George Ritzer uses the metaphor of “McDonaldization of society”,
[14:10.98]and that we should voice our protest by eating in local “mom and pop”
[14:16.41]restaurants rather than patronizing national or international fast-food chains.
[14:22.32]Despite Ritzer’s advice,
[14:25.32]McDonald’s and other fast-food chains are probably here to stay.
[14:30.36]They are getting more similar to one anther all the time,
[14:35.04]with hamburger chains offering chicken, chicken chains offering hamburgers,
[14:40.54]and all of all offering milk shakes and fries.
[14:44.82]Nutritionists have been warning that the typical fast-food diet is unhealthy
[14:50.38]if eaten too often. Consequently, some of the fast-food chains, such as McDonald’s,
[14:56.94]are now including healthier options for their customers
[15:00.60]along with the traditional hamburgers.
[15:03.10]Various healthy salads are now appearing on the menu boards,
[15:08.10]along with low fat salad dressing options.
[15:11.97]For children, fresh apple slices can now be chosen in the place of French fries
[15:18.10]in the children’s meal, and apple juice or low fat white and chocolate milk
[15:23.47]can be chosen instead of a cola.
[15:25.94]Bottled water also can now be purchased instead of a soft drink
[15:30.95]if one so choose.
[15:32.72]Most people believe that this trend of healthier eating will continue.
[15:38.22]Questions 26 to 28 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[15:42.97]Question 26. What influences does fast food bring to people’s life?
[16:05.40]Question 27. Which of the following is true about fast food according to the passage?
[16:29.02]Question 28. Why does McDonald change their traditional hamburgers?
[16:49.99]Passage Two
[16:51.00]Culture is a very broad term used to describe the arts,
[16:55.25]the beliefs, the values, the traditions, the customs,
[16:59.81]and the institutions that are considered to be characteristic of a community,
[17:05.93]a people, a region, or a nation.
[17:09.00]Culture also includes the languages and dialects that people use
[17:14.68]to express their feelings and to communicate with each other.
[17:18.71]Although many cultures in the world have remained isolated for centuries,
[17:23.08]commerce and trade have often been sources of all sorts of cultural exchanges,
[17:29.24]ranging from foods to tools.
[17:32.18]Chinese tea and other inventions reached Europe thanks to the Silk Route,
[17:37.27]for example. However, cultural exchanges have not always been fair or balanced.
[17:43.34]Throughout history, wars and political decisions have destroyed cultures
[17:48.90]and forced people to adopt the language and the customs of the dominant civilization.
[17:54.65]It is often assumed that if a culture is technologically advanced,
[17:59.77]it must be superior or that if a culture is young it must be inferior.
[18:05.15]Every one tends to make value judgments about other cultures.
[18:09.80]Finding fault with or making fun of other customs
[18:13.06]and beliefs is often merely a way of supporting
[18:16.87]our complacency or our pride.
[18:19.17]It is certainly much easier to learn about other cultures
[18:22.85]if one approaches them with an open mind
[18:25.64]and if one respects differences rather than criticizing them.
[18:29.58]Often something that appears strange or unusual in another culture
[18:34.55]is in fact very logical and part of a deeply rooted tradition.
[18:39.26]What might seem rude in one culture might seem perfectly normal
[18:43.58]and acceptable in another culture.
[18:45.79]Questions 29 to 31 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[18:53.10]Question 29.How did Chinese tea reach Europe?
[19:14.31]Question 30.What has destroyed culture in history according to the passage ?
[19:35.98]Question 31.Which character is necessary to learn about another culture?
[19:55.84]Passage Three
[19:58.53]Because Ireland is an island geographically near the mainland of the United Kingdom,
[20:04.52]English rulers have fought since the middle ages to retain political control over it.
[20:10.65]Attracted by the lush farmland,
[20:13.07]English and Scottish landowners settled there,
[20:16.97]and in time of famine or political unrest, the local workers suffered,
[20:22.10]while their landlords were cushioned by their wealth.
[20:25.53]The history of modern Ireland is, in fact, largely a story of resentment
[20:31.65]between the Irish and their English and Scottish rulers.
[20:35.15]Since the 1920’s, Ireland has been divided into two parts:
[20:41.16]Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
[20:44.88]The north is still part of the United Kingdom and is predominantly Protestant;
[20:49.84]the south is an independent republic and is mainly Catholic.
[20:54.02]The majority in Northern Ireland accept this political compromise,
[20:59.58]but the active and mainly Catholic minority are fighting for union
[21:04.17]with the independent republic of Southern Ireland.
[21:07.17]The IRA, the Irish Republic Army, have mounted bombing campaigns on military
[21:13.80]and civil targets in Northern Ireland and England,
[21:17.92]they have sent letter-bombs to public figures,
[21:21.33]they have shot fellow Irishmen who support the British or belong to opposing,
[21:27.08]and now equally militant Protestant groups.
[21:30.51]As a result of this, the British have stationed an army in Belfast,
[21:36.33]the IRA have been outlawed,
[21:39.09]and several of them have spent many years in prison
[21:42.05]or have died in support of their cause.
[21:44.86]Whether this level of violence and repression is justifiable,
[21:49.36]and whether the violence that could result from political change
[21:53.42]would be worthwhile are the controversial issues
[21:56.26]that divide everybody involved.
[21:58.89]Questions 32 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard.
[22:05.33]Question 32. Why did those English and Scottish landowners settle in Ireland?
[22:27.89]Question33 What's the relationship between the Irish and their rulers in history?
[22:48.11]Question34 Which is true about North Ireland according to the passage?
[23:09.43]Question35 Which is true about the IRA according to the passage?
[23:27.14]Section C
[23:27.86]Directions: In this section, you will hear a passage three times.
[23:33.70]When the passage is read for the first time,
[23:36.63]you should listen carefully for its general idea.
[23:39.98]When the passage is read for the second time,
[23:43.60]you are required to fill in the blanks numbered from 36 to 43
[23:48.26]with the exact words you have just heard.
[23:51.42]For blanks numbered from 44 to 46 you are required to
[23:58.08]fill in the missing information.
[23:59.98]For these blanks, you can either use the exact words you have just heard
[24:05.64]or write down the main points in your own words.
[24:09.04]Finally, when the passage is read for the third time,
[24:13.64]you should check what you have written.
[24:16.42]Now listen to the passage.
[24:19.26]Public opinion polls are regularly conducted and published in many countries.
[24:26.73]They measure not only support for political parties but also public opinion
[24:33.01]on a wide range of social and political issues.
[24:36.64]They are frequently published in major newspapers and are generally accepted
[24:42.10]as useful tools by businesses, political organizations,
[24:46.39]the mass media and government, and academic research groups.
[24:50.80]Hundreds of public polling firms operate around the world.
[24:55.32]The Gallup Poll and Harris Poll are among the best known in the US.
[25:01.26]In business, polls are used to test consumers’ preferences
[25:05.82]and to discover what gives a product its appeal.
[25:09.44]Responses to commercial polls help businesses in planning marketing
[25:14.82]and advertising strategies and in making changes
[25:18.57]in a product to increase its sales.
[25:21.01]In politics, polls are used to obtain information about voters’ attitudes
[25:26.91]toward candidates, to put forward candidates with winning potential,
[25:31.83]and to plan campaigns. Polling organizations have also been successful
[25:38.13]in predicting the outcome of elections. By polling voters on Election Day,
[25:43.48]it is often possible to determine the probable winner
[25:47.86]even before the voting booths close.
[25:50.73]Newspapers, magazines, radio and televisions are heavy users of
[25:57.39]public opinion polling information,
[25:59.85]especially political information that helps to predict election results
[26:04.89]or measure the popularity of government officials and candidates.
[26:09.26]The public’s attitude toward various social, economic,
[26:13.52]and international issues is also considered valuable and newsworthy.
[26:18.83]Governments use opinion polls to find out public sentiment about issues of interest.
[26:24.89]They also use polling methods to determine unemployment rates,
[26:29.55]crime rates and other social and economic indicators.
[26:33.82]Opinion polls have also been employed extensively in academic research,
[26:39.80]particularly in the social sciences.
[26:42.99]They have been valuable in studying socialization,
[26:46.98]political attitudes, and economic behavior.
[26:51.98]Now the passage will be read again.
[26:54.57]Public opinion polls are regularly conducted and published in many countries.
[27:00.07]They measure not only support for political parties but also public opinion
[27:06.58]on a wide range of social and political issues.
[27:10.29]They are frequently published in major newspapers and are generally accepted
[27:15.64]as useful tools by businesses, political organizations,
[27:20.23]the mass media and government, and academic research groups.
[27:24.51]Hundreds of public polling firms operate around the world.
[27:28.92]The Gallup Poll and Harris Poll are among the best known in the US.
[27:34.70]In business, polls are used to test consumers’ preferences
[27:39.26]and to discover what gives a product its appeal.
[27:43.01]Responses to commercial polls help businesses in planning marketing
[27:48.95]and advertising strategies and in making changes
[27:52.07]in a product to increase its sales.
[27:54.51]In politics, polls are used to obtain information about voters’ attitudes
[28:00.07]toward candidates, to put forward candidates with winning potential,
[28:05.32]and to plan campaigns.
[28:58.47]Polling organizations have also been successful
[29:02.21]in predicting the outcome of elections. By polling voters on Election Day,
[29:07.96]it is often possible to determine the probable winner
[29:11.93]even before the voting booths close.
[29:15.31]Newspapers, magazines, radio and televisions are heavy users of
[29:21.37]public opinion polling information,
[29:24.09]especially political information that helps to predict election results
[29:29.19]or measure the popularity of government officials and candidates.
[29:34.16]The public’s attitude toward various social, economic,
[29:37.49]and international issues is also considered valuable and newsworthy.
[30:33.53]Governments use opinion polls to find out public sentiment about issues of interest.
[30:39.06]They also use polling methods to determine unemployment rates,
[30:43.53]crime rates and other social and economic indicators.
[30:48.43]Opinion polls have also been employed extensively in academic research,
[30:53.94]particularly in the social sciences.
[31:46.43]They have been valuable in studying socialization,
[31:50.03]political attitudes, and economic behavior.
[31:56.76]Now the passage will be read for the third time.
[32:00.70]Public opinion polls are regularly conducted and published in many countries.
[32:06.24]They measure not only support for political parties but also public opinion
[32:12.14]on a wide range of social and political issues.
[32:16.01]They are frequently published in major newspapers and are generally accepted
[32:21.54]as useful tools by businesses, political organizations,
[32:25.74]the mass media and government, and academic research groups.
[32:30.51]Hundreds of public polling firms operate around the world.
[32:35.17]The Gallup Poll and Harris Poll are among the best known in the US.
[32:40.89]In business, polls are used to test consumers’ preferences
[32:45.48]and to discover what gives a product its appeal.
[32:49.17]Responses to commercial polls help businesses in planning marketing
[32:54.51]and advertising strategies and in making changes
[32:57.99]in a product to increase its sales.
[33:00.30]In politics, polls are used to obtain information about voters’ attitudes
[33:06.30]toward candidates, to put forward candidates with winning potential,
[33:11.43]and to plan campaigns. Polling organizations have also been successful
[33:17.70]in predicting the outcome of elections. By polling voters on Election Day,
[33:23.18]it is often possible to determine the probable winner
[33:27.39]even before the voting booths close.
[33:30.39]Newspapers, magazines, radio and televisions are heavy users of
[33:36.55]public opinion polling information,
[33:38.99]especially political information that helps to predict election results
[33:44.24]or measure the popularity of government officials and candidates.
[33:48.64]The public’s attitude toward various social, economic,
[33:53.12]and international issues is also considered valuable and newsworthy.
[33:58.24]Governments use opinion polls to find out public sentiment about issues of interest.
[34:04.33]They also use polling methods to determine unemployment rates,
[34:09.08]crime rates and other social and economic indicators.
[34:13.11]Opinion polls have also been employed extensively in academic research,
[34:19.40]particularly in the social sciences.
[34:22.71]They have been valuable in studying socialization,
[34:26.36]political attitudes, and economic behavior.
[34:32.69]This is the end of listening comprehension

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